The Divide Over Involuntary Mental Health Treatment

The attacks near the University of California, Santa Barbara, are renewing focus on programs aimed at requiring treatment for people who are mentally ill as a way to prevent mass shootings and other violence.  In California, a 2002 law allows authorities to require outpatient mental health care for people who have been refusing it. Proponents argue that this kind of intervention could prevent violent acts.  But counties within the state have been slow to adopt the legislation, and mental health professionals are divided over its effects.

To read the full original article, click here.

The Divide Over Involuntary Mental Health Treatment

The attacks near the University of California, Santa Barbara, are renewing focus on programs aimed at requiring treatment for people who are mentally ill as a way to prevent mass shootings and other violence.  In California, a 2002 law allows authorities to require outpatient mental health care for people who have been refusing it. Proponents argue that this kind of intervention could prevent violent acts.  But counties within the state have been slow to adopt the legislation, and mental health professionals are divided over its effects.

To read the full original article, click here.