Executing “Idiots”

At the end of its term, the Supreme Court revealed its deep divisions over the death penalty. In Glossip v. Gross, the central issue was the constitutionality of a particular drug that Oklahoma used in its lethal injections. However, the decision took on new dimensions when Justice Stephen Breyer called upon the court to consider the more fundamental question of whether the death penalty itself is constitutional. Unsurprisingly, Justice Antonin Scalia responded with exasperation, saying that this issue has been raised and settled many times. “Welcome to Groundhog day,” he said.

To read the full original article, click here.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Executing “Idiots”

At the end of its term, the Supreme Court revealed its deep divisions over the death penalty. In Glossip v. Gross, the central issue was the constitutionality of a particular drug that Oklahoma used in its lethal injections. However, the decision took on new dimensions when Justice Stephen Breyer called upon the court to consider the more fundamental question of whether the death penalty itself is constitutional. Unsurprisingly, Justice Antonin Scalia responded with exasperation, saying that this issue has been raised and settled many times. “Welcome to Groundhog day,” he said.

To read the full original article, click here.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *