In West Africa, a Mission to Save Minds

SANDEMA, Ghana — For more than a year, Rebecca Ajadogbil had been living alone in her head, convinced that strange men were coming to capture and murder her.

Confined to a room in her family’s mud-walled compound here, not far from the border with Burkina Faso, she was hundreds of miles from the nearest psychiatric ward. Those closest to her suspected that she was possessed and called in local healers, who plied her with herbal brews and chanted incantations over her.

But in a stroke of fortune that is vanishingly rare in rural West Africa, a local nonprofit heard about her and sent a nurse on a motorbike who, with the family’s permission, started Ms. Ajadogbil on a generic drug that treats schizophrenia. She began feeling strangely different.

To read the full original article, click here.

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In West Africa, a Mission to Save Minds

SANDEMA, Ghana — For more than a year, Rebecca Ajadogbil had been living alone in her head, convinced that strange men were coming to capture and murder her.

Confined to a room in her family’s mud-walled compound here, not far from the border with Burkina Faso, she was hundreds of miles from the nearest psychiatric ward. Those closest to her suspected that she was possessed and called in local healers, who plied her with herbal brews and chanted incantations over her.

But in a stroke of fortune that is vanishingly rare in rural West Africa, a local nonprofit heard about her and sent a nurse on a motorbike who, with the family’s permission, started Ms. Ajadogbil on a generic drug that treats schizophrenia. She began feeling strangely different.

To read the full original article, click here.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *