We spend $100 billion on policing. We have no idea what works.

It is one thing to count crimes that did happen; it is quite another to count crimes that didn’t. We can, of course, compare crime rates before and after a new technology or tactic is put in place, but it is hard to establish the cause of any trends. Did crime go down because of that new tactic, or did it decline for other reasons?

Police are more likely to adopt new technology because another department has it than because of reasoned cost-benefit analysis.

Read the full article here.

See Vera Institute’s Cost Benefit Analysis toolkit.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

We spend $100 billion on policing. We have no idea what works.

It is one thing to count crimes that did happen; it is quite another to count crimes that didn’t. We can, of course, compare crime rates before and after a new technology or tactic is put in place, but it is hard to establish the cause of any trends. Did crime go down because of that new tactic, or did it decline for other reasons?

Police are more likely to adopt new technology because another department has it than because of reasoned cost-benefit analysis.

Read the full article here.

See Vera Institute’s Cost Benefit Analysis toolkit.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *